Category Archives: Law Students

Predicting Bar Exam Success Using LSAT Scores and Law School Performance

A team from Texas Tech University School of Law has recently released a very interesting study entitled, Will I Pass the Bar Exam?: Predicting Student Success Using LSAT Scores and Law School Performance.

Here’s the abstract:

Texas Tech University School of Law has undertaken a statistical analysis of its recent alumni, comparing their performance in law school with their success on the Texas bar exam. The authors conclude that LSAT predicts bar exam success while undergraduate GPA does not. The study also replicates findings in previous literature that both 1L and final law school GPA predict bar exam success.

Going beyond existing literature, this study also conducted more specific analysis of how student performance in specific courses can predict success on affiliated subcomponents of the bar exam; the Article identifies which courses have significant impact on bar exam performance and which do not.

Additionally, the Article reports a completely new analysis of whether student participation in curricular student engagement activities (such as journal, clinic, and advocacy competitions) predicts bar exam success.

Read more details at the Law School Academic Support Blog

Study Identifies Gaps in the Research Sources Being Taught in Law School

Rebecca S. Trammell, Law Library Director of Stetson University College of Law has recently completed a dissertation on Technology & Legal Research: What Is Taught & What Is Used in the Practice of Law.

Using data from three sources (the 2013 ALWD Survey; a review of syllabi; and the 2014 law school legal research survey), the study asks whether law schools are instructing students in the legal research resources used by attorneys in the practice of law.

According to Trammell, the answer is no.  Here’s an excerpt from page 79:

The results of the law school legal research survey indicate significant gaps in law school instruction in state administrative law for both the attorney’s home state and other states and for state case law research for states other than the attorney’s home state. In addition, law school instruction is not focused on several tools used in law practice, specifically legal forms, legal news sources, experts, information about judges, jury verdict information, and finding and using public records. Based on the use of these resources by practicing attorneys, instruction in these areas would result in law students’ gaining more practice-ready skills.

ABA Offers Free Membership for Law Students

The American Bar Association has announced that it will offer free membership to all students enrolled at ABA-approved law schools. The membership grants law students access to resources tailored to their interests and needs, opportunities to build their professional skills plus access to the ABA’s job listings, clerkships, internships and career events.

Law students can enroll online at www.americanbar.org/abalawstudents or by calling the ABA Service Center at 800-285-2221.

Hat tip to Ross-Blakley Law Library Blog

WI Supreme Court Petition Aims to Extend Diploma Privilege to Out-of-state Grads

From the State Bar of Wisconsin News:

A petition filed on Sept. 25 with the Wisconsin Supreme Court aims to extend the “diploma privilege” to graduates of all ABA-approved law schools or abolish it entirely.
Petitioner Steven Levine, a past State Bar of Wisconsin president, and 70 other State Bar members seek to amend SCR 40.03, which exempts from a bar examination requirement those graduates of an ABA-accredited law school whose curriculum includes the specific study of Wisconsin law.

Read the full article for more.
The Supreme Court has scheduled a public hearing and open administrative conference on the petition for 9:30 a.m. on September 30, 2010.

Free Amazon Shipping for College Students

Amazon is offering a free one year membership to Amazon Prime for college students ($79 value – must have a valid .edu email address).
Amazon Prime membership gives you free 2-day shipping on millions of items – including textbooks! I just successfully signed up as a a law student – I know where I’ll be ordering my books this fall.
For more information, see the Amazon Student help page.
Source: Freebies4Mom

Wisconsin Diploma Privilege Challenge Dismissed

From WKOW TV news:

State attorneys have settled a lawsuit challenging Wisconsin’s policy of allowing in-state law students to practice without passing the bar exam.
The state has agreed to pay Corrine Wiesmueller $7,500 to drop the lawsuit.
Wiesmueller and her husband, Christopher, alleged Wisconsin’s so-called diploma privilege violates the federal Commerce Clause by giving Wisconsin law students an unfair advantage over out-of-state students, who need to pass the bar before they can practice in Wisconsin.
U.S. District Judge Barbara Crabb has dismissed the lawsuit.

See the stipulation and order of dismissal.

Attorney General Responds to Partial Summary Judgment Motion in Diploma Privilege Suit

From WisBar InsideTrack:

Reminding the federal district court of the need to develop an evidentiary record in the constitutional challenge to Wisconsin’s “diploma privilege,” the state attorney general criticized the plaintiffs’ motion for partial summary judgment and permanent injunctive relief as premature….
The attorney general criticized the plaintiffs for misunderstanding the rationale of the diploma privilege.
“Plaintiffs’ contention that Wisconsin violates the Constitution by testing general legal principles on its bar exam is based on the erroneous presumption that only instruction in Wisconsin law justifies the diploma privilege,” the attorney general wrote. “From this premise, plaintiffs ask the Court to reach the erroneous conclusion that the bar exam can only test Wisconsin law.”
“The premise and the conclusion are wrong,” the attorney general argued. “The diploma privilege is only extended to graduates who have completed a curriculum mandated by the Wisconsin Supreme Court, which includes instruction in particular legal subject areas, as well as in Wisconsin law, and whose completion of that curriculum has been certified by the deans of the University of Wisconsin or Marquette University law schools.”
Accordingly, the attorney general said, the plaintiffs make a second erroneous assumption that all graduates of ABA-accredited law schools have received an identical education. No out-of-state law school is directed by the Wisconsin Supreme Court to certify that all of its graduates have successfully completed the curriculum set forth in the supreme court’s rules. The attorney general informed the court of its intention to elaborate further on the curricular differences in the course of developing its evidentiary record….
The attorney general noted that in its remand order, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals remarked that the state prevails if the diploma privilege is found to be “at least minimally reasonable.” This is because the state’s power to regulate admission to the practice of law is subject only to “narrow” constitutional limitation, the attorney general asserted.
“‘Minimally reasonable’ is a low hurdle,” the attorney general said. “The Justices’ greater familiarity with graduates of Wisconsin law schools, their greater familiarity with the deans and faculty at these schools, their practical ability to ensure compliance with SCR 40.03’s curriculum requirements at those schools, and their greater involvement in educational activities at those schools are alone sufficient to surmount it.”

Petition Filed with WI Supreme Court Aims to Extend Diploma Privilege to Out-of-State Law School Grads

From the latest edition of WisBar InsideTrack:

Sept. 29, 2009 – A petition filed on Sept. 25 with the Wisconsin Supreme Court aims to extend the “diploma privilege” to graduates of all ABA-approved law schools or abolish it entirely.
Petitioner Steven Levine, a past State Bar of Wisconsin president, and 70 other State Bar members seek to amend SCR 40.03, which exempts from a bar examination requirement those graduates of an ABA-accredited law school whose curriculum includes the specific study of Wisconsin law. Among those State Bar members is Christopher Wiesmueller, the plaintiffs’ counsel in a federal class action lawsuit, Wiesmueller v. Kosobucki, 07-C-0211, challenging the constitutionality of the diploma privilege.

Read the full article for more.